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Swinburne Harvard style guide The Swinburne Harvard style guide is an author-date citation style. This guide is based on Snooks and Co. 2002, Style manual for authors, editors and printers6th edn, John Wiley & Sons, Milton, Qld. Always check with your lecturer that this is the citation style guide required for your unit. Download a printable PDF with examples. Download a printable PDF with examples. To cite a reference in the text of your work, insert the reference material and then immediately place the author's surname and the year of publication in brackets after it, e.g. (Dawkins 2012) You must include the page number(s) if you are paraphrasing the reference or quoting it, e.g. "The universe has. " (Dawkins 2012, p. 226). If you use the author's name in your sentence because they are well-known, then place the year of publication and page number in brackets after the name, e.g. Dawkins (2012, p. 226) rationalises that. When you quote a single sentence, enclose it in double quotation marks: " ". When you quote two or more sentences, then do not enclose them in double quotation marks – instead, place them Gender in Greek Mythology – Kate Gough a new line, indent the entire quote and finish with the in-text reference. New text after that quote should commence on a new line and not be indented. If you wish to quote a quote (not paraphrase a quote), then the in-text reference begins with the author(s) of Personal Statement Essay Examples Prompt 1 – 547028 quote, then a comma, then the phrase ‘cited in’, then the author(s), year and page number (if applicable) of the source you are using. For example, if you were reading an article by Pavlovski published in 2017 and on page 33 of Pavlovski‘s article it included a quote from one of William Shakespeare’s famous plays, and you wanted to quote that quote by Shakespeare, then the in-text reference would be: (Shakespeare, cited in Pavlovski 2017, p. 33). Your reference list does not need to mention Shakespeare, just Pavlovski. Authors may be a single individual, a number of individuals, or an organisation. In-text references use author's surnames only and do not include initials. Where there is no author, use the title of the work (in italics) instead (e.g. Hatching and Thirteen Ed Online - Adult Ed - Lesson Plans brine shrimp 2010, p. 2). For two or more authors, use an ampersand (&) between the last two author's names. If you are writing their names directly into your text, replace the ampersand with the word 'and'. If you cite two or more works at the one place in your work by the same author but they were published in different years, list the author's name once and then arrange the years of publication for Urban Decay Discount Codes 2018 - Best Coupon Codes in-text citation from oldest to newest e.g. (Flannery 2003, p. 11; 2005, p. 28; 2008, p. 17). For two or more authors with the same surname publishing different works in the same year, include all author initials after a comma after their surname, eg. Different research reported the same effects occurring, regardless whether it was in lakes (Nguyen, D 2009, p. 3) or rivers (Nguyen, L 2009, p. 145). You can cite two or more different information sources in the same single in-text references (especially when those sources all make the same point) eg. (Comert 2013, p. 59; Faw 2013, p. 374; Li & Gao 2013, p. 475). The Harvard Style is based on a combination of author and date. If a date of publication cannot be found use one of the following subsitutes: c. 1995 = circa 1995 (an approximate date), where you can determine to within a year or two without much effort. You should try to use this whenever possible eg. Evidently there is still uncertainty and ongoing debate about the actual colours painted on Tunisian Tigers (Chaltry c. 2002). 2005 ? = a dubious / possible date. (Use when you can only determine to within a few years.) n.d. = no known date (Use this very sparingly. Most dates can be roughly determined.) forthcoming = a work to be published in the near future. In-text references should include page number details (if available) if you are paraphrasing or quoting. Page numbers are not required if referencing an entire work, eg. (Milligan 1985). If page numbers are not provided or possible, then author name and year of publication are sufficient. Use p. for a single page and pp. for a range of consecutive pages, e.g. (Dawkins 2012, pp. 15-19) Additional details such as volume numbers should only be used when necessary to avoid confusion with other volumes of the same series by an author. All in-text citations must have fully detailed, corresponding entries placed in a reference list at the end of your assignment, unless an in-text citation is a personal communication which has been fully written into the body of your assignment and your assignment is not significantly comprised of personal communications. Reference list entries should be arranged alphabetically by author's surname (or by organisation name). If an organisation name begins with 'The', ignore it and arrange their name alphabetically by the next word, eg. The Centre for Academic Excellence is not arranged down in the letter T, but at the letter C. Each new information source should begin on a new line. Authors may be a single individual, a number of individuals, or an organisation. In-text references use author's surnames only and do not include initials. Where there is no author, use Challenges of the dissertation process
title of the work (in italics) instead e.g. ( Hatching and raising brine shrimp 2010, p. 2). For two or three authors, place an ampersand (&) between the last two author's names. If you are writing their names directly into your text, replace the ampersand with the word 'and' eg. McCurley, Lynch and Jackson state that only keen volunteers are productive volunteers (2012, p. 78). For more than three authors, place the first listed author’s surname, then insert ‘et al.’, then the year of publication, and page number(s) too if paraphrasing or quoting eg. …state control thus working against its citizens (Baldino et al. 2011, pp. 137-138). If you are writing their names directly into your text, both the first listed author’s surname and ‘et al.’ are not enclosed in brackets eg. SAT Online Registration - The College Board et al. (2011, pp. 137-138) identify two agencies struggling… If you cite two or more works at the one place in your work by the same author but they were published in different years, list the author's name once and then arrange the years of publication for the in-text citation from oldest to newest e.g. (Flannery 2003, p. 11; 2005, p. 28; 2008, p. 17). For two or more authors with the same surname publishing different works in the same year, include all author initials after a comma after their surname, eg. Different research reported the same effects occurring, regardless whether it was in lakes (Nguyen, D 2009, p. 3) or rivers (Nguyen, L 2009, p. 145). You can cite two or more different information sources in the same single in-text references (especially when those sources all make the same point) eg. (Comert 2013, p. 59; Faw 2013, p. 374; Li & Gao 2013, p. 475). The Harvard Style is based on a combination of author and date. If a date of publication cannot be found, use one of the following substitutes: c. 1995 = circa 1995 (an approximate date), where you can determine to within a year or two without much effort. You should try to use this whenever possible eg. Evidently there is still uncertainty and ongoing debate about the actual colours painted on Tunisian Tigers (Chaltry c. 2002). 2005 ? = a dubious / possible date. (Use when you can only determine to within a few years.) n.d. = no known date (Use this very sparingly. Most dates can be roughly determined.) forthcoming = a work to be published in the near future. Book titles, journal names and website titles should be in italics. Only the first letter of the first word and proper nouns of book titles should be capitalised. All major words in the titles of journals, newspapers and magazines should be capitalised. Chapter titles and journal/newspaper/magazine article titles should be enclosed in single quotation marks; they Promo not be in italics. Use the abbreviations vol. for volume and no. for issue number. If there is no volume numberuse the issue number. If there is no volume or issue numberlist any available designation such as the day and/or month or season. Insert the series title after the title of the work. The series title is not italicised. If the series has a number or volume, insert 'vol.' or 'no.' after the series title.

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